Alcoholism Among the Latino and Hispanic Population

Today, Hispanics make up about 18 percent of the American population. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), research has indicated that Hispanic American drinking patterns may be contingent to acculturation, the process by which an individual may experience cultural modifications by adapting to traits from another culture. Clinical and experimental studies performed on alcohol and racial/ethnic minorities have reported that minority groups such as Hispanics are at greater risk of alcohol-related problems. 

 

Hispanics reside in communities where alcohol availability is superior. Since we are frequently targeted and exposed to alcohol advertisements, it places us at greater risk of alcohol-related problems. As a result, if we choose to consume a single alcoholic beverage or multiple alcoholic beverages, these advertisements may be putting us at risk of binge drinking and may increase our susceptibility to alcohol abuse. 

 

Alcohol misuse can cause:

• Anxiety and irritability

• Sleep problems

• Weakened immune system

• Changes in sexual function

• Cognitive problems

• Liver damage

• Inadequate blood sugar levels

• Heart-related problems

• Alcohol dependence 

 

A widespread alcohol-related problem amongst Latinos is chronic liver disease, the end phase of liver damage that results in severe scarring of the internal organ. The prevalence within our ethnic group is unknown, although alcohol abuse has raised some concerns. 

 

Vitamin B deficiencies have also been reported in excessive and regular alcohol drinkers. Vitamin B deficiencies are associated with a variety of chronic diseases. There is also a link between B vitamins and stress and anxiety.

 

B-Complex from Natura-Genics® includes a combination of all the necessary vitamins including thiamine, folic acid, B-6, B-12, and many more. These B vitamins will not only promote immune function and an increase in energy, but they will also promote relief from stress, anxiety, and tension that may combat the need for alcohol consumption when experiencing stress.

 

So, what could be the reason why Hispanic Americans may be abusing alcohol? 

As previously stated, the adaptation to the new cultural traits and social patterns of the American population may be a cause of this health-related issue. Distress may increase as one endeavors to gain an adequate amount of revenue to support their families, struggling to familiarize themselves with a foreign language, as well as the desire to obtain a higher education. These are all contributing factors that may increase an individual to experience physical and mental pressure. 

 

Many people turn to alcohol when dealing with stressful situations. It is important to find a healthy and natural way to relieve stress and supplements can help. 

  

Relax+™ will help alleviate symptoms of stress and promote a feeling of well-being. No more “I need a beer” at the end of a long, stressful day.

 

Other tips for managing stress:

•  Meditation

• Go for a walk or run 

• Connect with others

•  Yoga 

• Aromatherapy

If you find yourself binge drinking often the ingredient kudzu root, found in Formula AA™, has been shown through research to support reduced alcohol dependence and consumption. 

 

Always remember, when you are having a stressful day, “the greatest weapon against stress is our ability to choose one thought over the other”- William James. Think twice about escaping reality with an alcoholic beverage that can only temporarily do the trick. 

 

References

Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research. "Drinking trends increase for whites, blacks, and Hispanics." ScienceDaily, 20 Jul. 2010. Web. 23 Dec. 2011.

 

"Alcohol and the Hispanic Community." National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Rethinking Drinking, April 2011. Web. 20 Dec 2011.

<http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/HispanicFact/hispanicFact.pdf>.

 

"Chronic Liver Disease and Hispanic Americans." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Office of Minority Health, 28 June 2010. Web. 20 Dec 2011. <http://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/templates/content.aspx?lvl=3&lvlID=534&ID=6207>.

 

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